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Purpose of Life

 

Life’s Purpose for Unbeliever

A father went into a toy store to buy his son a Christmas present. The salesman showed him a new educational toy. It came unassembled, but no matter how the child put the pieces together, they wouldn’t fit. You see, the toy was designed to teach the child how to deal with life.

        Such is the predicament of man without God. He is never able to put his life together. A life without Christ is a life of futility.

 

Life’s Purpose for Unbeliever

The universe is merely a fleeting idea in God’s mind-a pretty uncomfortable thought, particularly if you’ve just made a down payment on a house.—Woody Allen

 

Life’s Purpose for Unbeliever

G.N. Clark is reported to have said in his inaugural address as president of Cambridge University, “There is no secret and no plan in history to be discovered. I do not believe that any future consummation could make any sense of all the irrationalities of preceding ages. If it could not explain them, still less could it justify them.”

 

Life’s Purpose for Unbelievers

In the introduction to his A History of Europe, H.A.L. Fisher writes:

        One intellectual excitement has been denied me. Men wiser and more learned than I have discovered in history a plot, a rhythm, a predetermined pattern. But these harmonies are concealed from me. I can see only one emergency following another, as wave follows upon wave, only one great fact with respect to which, since it is unique, there can be no generalization, only one safe rule for the historian-that he should recognize in the development of human destiny the play of the contingent and the unforeseen.

 

Life’s Purpose for Unbelievers

Only religion is able to answer the question of the purpose of life. One can hardly go wrong in concluding that the idea of a purpose in life stands and falls with the religious system.—Sigmund Freud

 

Life’s Purpose for Unbelievers

Andre Maurios said, “The universe is indifferent. Who created it? Why are we here upon this puny mud heap spinning in infinite space? I have not the slightest idea, and I am quite convinced that no one else has the least idea.”

 

Life’s Purpose for Unbelievers

Socialists usually offer an optimistic view of mankind, and so Orwell’s 1984 ends surprisingly pessimistically-evil conquers.

        Some have suggested this pessimism came because Orwell was dying as he wrote. Actually he was merely expressing a dilemma he had seen for some time. He knew that man’s central problem was the death of Christian belief. In 1944 he wrote, “Since about 1930 the world has given no reason for optimism whatever. Nothing is in sight except a welter of lies, hatred, cruelty, and ignorance, and beyond our present troubles loom waster ones which are only now entering into the European consciousness. It is quite possible that man’s major problems will ‘never’ be solved…The real problem is how to restore the religious attitude while accepting death as final. Men can be happy only when they do not assume that the object of life is happiness.”

        Before then, in 1940, he had written of Europe’s rejection of God-which he approved-this way: “For two hundred years we had sawed and sawed and sawed at the branch we were sitting on. And in the end, much more suddenly than anyone had foreseen, our efforts were rewarded, and down we came. But unfortunately there had been a little mistake: The thing at the bottom was not a bed of roses after all, it was a cesspool full of barbed wire…It appears that amputation of the soul isn’t just a simple surgical job, like having your appendix out. The wound has a tendency to go septic.”

 

Life’s Purpose for Unbelievers

Do the events of history make any sense? Or is life, as Shakespeare had Macbeth describe it, “a tale told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing”?—Macbeth, Act V,v.

 

Life’s Purpose for Unbelievers

A greatest possible impact a non-believer’s life can have on eternity is on the order of a large ship’s impact on the ocean. It leaves a wake, which may be very impressive for the moment, but which is gone without a trace within a few moments more.

 

Life’s Purpose for Unbeliever

A father went into a toy store to buy his son a Christmas present. The salesman showed him a new educational toy. It came unassembled, but no matter how the child put the pieces together, they wouldn’t fit. You see, the toy was designed to teach the child how to deal with life.

Such is the predicament of man without God. He is never able to put his life together. A life without Christ is a life of futility. ── Michael P. GreenIllustrations for Biblical Preaching

 

Life’s Purpose for Unbeliever

The universe is merely a fleeting idea in God’s mind-a pretty uncomfortable thought, particularly if you’ve just made a down payment on a house.— Woody Allen

 

Life’s Purpose for Unbeliever

G.N. Clark is reported to have said in his inaugural address as president of Cambridge University, “There is no secret and no plan in history to be discovered. I do not believe that any future consummation could make any sense of all the irrationalities of preceding ages. If it could not explain them, still less could it justify them.” ── Michael P. GreenIllustrations for Biblical Preaching

 

Life’s Purpose for Unbelievers

In the introduction to his A History of Europe, H.A.L. Fisher writes:

One intellectual excitement has been denied me. Men wiser and more learned than I have discovered in history a plot, a rhythm, a predetermined pattern. But these harmonies are concealed from me. I can see only one emergency following another, as wave follows upon wave, only one great fact with respect to which, since it is unique, there can be no generalization, only one safe rule for the historian-that he should recognize in the development of human destiny the play of the contingent and the unforeseen. ── Michael P. GreenIllustrations for Biblical Preaching

 

Life’s Purpose for Unbelievers

Only religion is able to answer the question of the purpose of life. One can hardly go wrong in concluding that the idea of a purpose in life stands and falls with the religious system.— Sigmund Freud

 

Life’s Purpose for Unbelievers

Andre Maurios said, “The universe is indifferent. Who created it? Why are we here upon this puny mud heap spinning in infinite space? I have not the slightest idea, and I am quite convinced that no one else has the least idea.” ── Michael P. GreenIllustrations for Biblical Preaching

 

Life’s Purpose for Unbelievers

Socialists usually offer an optimistic view of mankind, and so Orwell’s 1984 ends surprisingly pessimistically-evil conquers.

Some have suggested this pessimism came because Orwell was dying as he wrote. Actually he was merely expressing a dilemma he had seen for some time. He knew that man’s central problem was the death of Christian belief. In 1944 he wrote, “Since about 1930 the world has given no reason for optimism whatever. Nothing is in sight except a welter of lies, hatred, cruelty, and ignorance, and beyond our present troubles loom waster ones which are only now entering into the European consciousness. It is quite possible that man’s major problems will ‘never’ be solved…The real problem is how to restore the religious attitude while accepting death as final. Men can be happy only when they do not assume that the object of life is happiness.”

Before then, in 1940, he had written of Europe’s rejection of God-which he approved-this way: “For two hundred years we had sawed and sawed and sawed at the branch we were sitting on. And in the end, much more suddenly than anyone had foreseen, our efforts were rewarded, and down we came. But unfortunately there had been a little mistake: The thing at the bottom was not a bed of roses after all, it was a cesspool full of barbed wire…It appears that amputation of the soul isn’t just a simple surgical job, like having your appendix out. The wound has a tendency to go septic.” ── Michael P. GreenIllustrations for Biblical Preaching

 

Life’s Purpose for Unbelievers

Do the events of history make any sense? Or is life, as Shakespeare had Macbeth describe it, “a tale told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing”?— Macbeth, Act V,v.

 

Life’s Purpose for Unbelievers

A greatest possible impact a non-believer’s life can have on eternity is on the order of a large ship’s impact on the ocean. It leaves a wake, which may be very impressive for the moment, but which is gone without a trace within a few moments more. ── Michael P. GreenIllustrations for Biblical Preaching