| Back to Home Page | Back to Book Index |

 

Self Improvement

 

Works and Salvation

You would not scramble five good eggs and one rotten egg and serve the mixture to guests, expecting it to be acceptable. Even less can you serve up to God a life that has the good things in it tainted with deeds and thoughts that are rotten, and expect it to be acceptable to God.

If you wanted to get to heaven by your good works, then you would have to be perfect, which means complete obedience to God at all times. But all of us have fallen short of this! ── Michael P. GreenIllustrations for Biblical Preaching

 

Works and Salvation

A leading manufacturing company developed a new cake mix that required only water to be added. Tests were run, surveys were made, and the cake mix was found to be of superior quality to the other mixes available. It tasted good, it was easy to use, and it made a moist, tender cake. The company spent large sums of money on an advertising campaign and then released the cake mix to the general market. But few people bought the new cake mix.

The company then spent more money on a survey to find out why the cake mix didn’t sell. Based on the results of this survey, the company recalled the mix, reworked the formula, and released the revised cake mix. The new cake mix required that one add not only water, but also an egg. It sold like hot cakes and is now a leading product in the field. You see, the first cake mix was just too simple to be believable. People would not accept it. The same is true of salvation by grace. ── Michael P. GreenIllustrations for Biblical Preaching

 

Works and Salvation

An old parable says, “A silly servant who is told to open the door sets his shoulder to it and pushes with all his might, but the door stirs not, and he cannot enter, use what strength he may. Another comes with a key and easily unlocks the door and enters right readily.”

Those who would be saved by works are pushing at heaven’s gate without result; but faith is the key that opens the gate at once. ── Michael P. GreenIllustrations for Biblical Preaching

 

Works and Salvation

Do you recall the last time you went to a nice restaurant with a friend? Perhaps, after a great meal, the waiter brought the check, and before you knew it your friend had paid the tab.

Do you remember how you felt? That you wanted somehow to even the score? Perhaps you vowed to pick up the tab the next time you went out? These feelings are quite natural. We like to be independent, not obligated to anyone for anything. For the natural man, the same principle carries over into the way he views religion, for the natural man tries to earn his way into God’s favor. ── Michael P. GreenIllustrations for Biblical Preaching

 

Works and Salvation

The last words of the Buddha, as he was dying, are given as, “And now, O priests, I take my leave of you; all the constituents of being are transitory; work out your salvation with diligence.”

As John Noss, the noted religion scholar explains, “Like Mahavira (founder of Jainism), the Buddha showed each disciple how to rely for salvation upon himself, on his own powers, focused upon redemption by spiritual self-discipline. Here was the strictest sort of humanism in religion.” ── Michael P. GreenIllustrations for Biblical Preaching

 

Works and Salvation

I began to fast twice a week for thirty-six hours together, prayed many times a day and received the sacrament every Lord’s Day. I fasted myself almost to death all the forty days of Lent, during which I made it a point of duty never to go less than three times a day to public worship, besides seven times a day to my private prayers. Yet I knew no more that I was to be born a new creature in Christ Jesus than if I had never been born at all.— George Whitefield

 

WORKS, RIGHTEOUSNESS

The citizens of Feldkirch, Austria, didn't know what to do. Napoleon's massive army was preparing to attack. Soldiers had been spotted on the heights above the little town, which was situated on the Austrian border. A council of citizens was hastily summoned to decide whether they should try to defend themselves or display the white flag of surrender. It happened to be Easter Sunday, and the people had gathered in the local church. The pastor rose and said, "Friends, we have been counting on our own strength, and apparently that has failed. As this is the day of our Lord's resurrection, let us just ring the bells, have our services as usual, and leave the matter in His hands. We know only our weakness, and not the power of God to defend us." The council accepted his plan and the church bells rang. The enemy, hearing the sudden peal, concluded that the Austrian army had arrived during the night to defend the town. Before the service ended, the enemy broke camp and left.

Source Unknown.


[According to a recent poll] 88% of Catholics and a majority of Presbyterian and Methodist evangelizers [those who actively try to share their "faith"] believe that "if people are generally good, or do enough good things for others during their lives, they will earn a place in heaven." 

National & International Religion Report, August 23, 1993.


A total of 36,000 Sadhus (Hindu holy men) were part of the estimated crowd of 40 million attending the two month Kumbh Mela festival in India last spring. More than 200 American Sadhus of the Hari Krishna groups brought millions of dollars worth of Hindu literature to the festival. 

One of our partners in South India explains the purpose of the ritual bathing in the river,  "They come for forgiveness of sins and salvation. Some thousands come stark naked--some of them rolling on the rough roads for miles, believing the festering sores on their bodies would earn them salvation...Hundreds have kept one arm lifted up for years until the arm gets shriveled with dry gangrene...others have stood on one leg for years, hanging on to a suspended sling while sleeping...all these are done to appease angry gods." 

During the festival, which takes place in the heat of summer, our Indian Christian partners set up free medical clinics. About 150 Christian students passed out literature and talked with pilgrims about the love of Christ. "Some received us with friendliness, some merely tolerated us, and others ferociously objected to the spread of Christianity," wrote our partner. A number of pilgrims accepted Christ, though circumstances prevented them from taking an open stand at the Kumbh Mela. But five Hindus, including two Sadhus, were baptized--the ultimate step of courage for a Hindu.

Partners, published by Partners International, August 1992, p. 7.


I read about an instant cake mix that was a big flop. The instructions said all you had to do was add water and bake. The company couldn't understand why it didn't sell -- until their research discovered that the buying public felt uneasy about a mix that required only water. Apparently people thought it was too easy. So the company altered the formula and changed the directions to call for adding an egg to the mix in addition to the water. The idea worked and sales jumped dramatically.

That story reminds me of how some people react to the plan of salvation. To them it sounds too easy and simple to be true, even though the Bible says, "By grace you have been saved through faith...; it is the gift of God, not of works" (Eph. 2:8-9). They feel that there is something more they must do, something they must add to God's "recipe" for salvation. They think they must perform good works to gain God's favor and earn eternal life. But the Bible is clear -- we are saved, "not by works of righteousness which we have done, but according to His mercy" (Titus 3:5).  Unlike the cake-mix manufacturer, God has not changed His "formula" to make salvation more marketable. The gospel we proclaim must be free of works, even though it may sound too easy. 

R.W.D. Daily Bread, June 2, 1992.


7000 Protestant youth from many denominations were asked whether they agreed with the following statements:

"The way to be accepted by God is to try sincerely to live a good life." More than 60% agreed.  

"God is satisfied if a person lives the best life he can." Almost 70% agreed.

"The main emphasis of the gospel is on God's rules for right living." More than half agreed.

Despite the efforts of evangelists, parachurch ministries and local churches, the percentage of American adults who are born again Christians is no different now than in 1982, according to a study by the Barna Research Group. 

The study found that 34% of all Americans can be identified as born again--that is, they have made a personal commitment to Jesus Christ, and say they will go to heaven because they have confessed their sins and accepted Christ as their savior. 

Among those surveyed, 62% said they had made a personal commitment to Jesus Christ that is still important in their lives today. However, among those who have made a commitment to Christ, only 55 percent believe they will go to heaven because of accepting Christ as their personal savior (the basic belief in the "born again" movement)...Most of those surveyed said they would go to heaven because of living a good life, or obeying the 10 commandments, or because all people will go to heaven. Others who said they had made a commitment to Christ said they were unsure about what will happen to them after they die. 

Reported in Inland Northwest Christian News, March 1990, p. 3.


In one of his sermons, A.C. Dixon told of an incident that took place in Brooklyn, N.Y. A detective who had been looking for a local citizen finally tracked him down in a drugstore. As the man began to make his purchase, the officer laid his hand on the citizen's shoulder and said, "You're under arrest; come with me!" 

Stunned, the man demanded, "What did I do?" 

The detective calmly replied, "You know what you did. You escaped from the Albany penitentiary several years ago. You went west, got married, and then came back here to live. We've been watching for you since you returned." 

Quietly the man admitted, "That's true, but I was sure you'd never find me. Before you take me in, could we stop by my house so I can talk to my family?" 

The officer agreed. When they got to his home, the man looked at his  wife and asked, "Haven't I been a kind husband and a good father?  Haven't I worked hard to make a living?" 

His wife answered, "Of course you have, but why are you asking me these questions?" Her husband then proceeded to explain what had happened and that he was now under arrest. He apparently had hoped that his record as an exemplary husband and father would impress the officer. Even so, he was still an escaped criminal. Though he was "right" with his family, he was all wrong with the state of New York.

Source Unknown.