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Election

 

Election

There was a boy who did not have much athletic ability. Every time he and his friends would play some game he was always the last to be chosen. One day two new fellows came to play with them and were allowed to be team captains because they were older. The first team captain chose the boy who had always been chosen last before. Why? Because they were brothers, and he loved his brother.

So it is with God. He chose us not because of our abilities, but because he loves us. ── Michael P. GreenIllustrations for Biblical Preaching

 

Election

The mere preaching of the gospel does not save an individual. The gospel message must be activated by the election and calling of God for an individual to be drawn to him. It would be as if one had thrown a rope to a drowning man. The throwing of that rope could not save the man unless someone were at the other end drawing him into shore.

This is what God has done. By his election, God draws to himself the one who has heard the message. The man may have the rope, but he still needs the efficient force of God drawing him in. Who, therefore, deserves the praise for salvation, the man who grabbed the rope? No—the God who draws him in! ── Michael P. GreenIllustrations for Biblical Preaching

 

Election

The resolution of election and free will has troubled theologians for centuries. One found an explanation in a picture of the door to heaven. On the side of the door facing the one who was about to enter heaven were written the words “Every one who calls upon the name of the Lord will be saved” (Rom. 10:13). One the side of the door facing those who were already in heaven were written the words “called through his grace” (Gal. 1:15). ── Michael P. GreenIllustrations for Biblical Preaching

 

Election

The general call of the gospel is like the sheet lightning we sometimes see on a summer evening—beautiful, grand—but who ever heard of anything being stuck by it? But the special call is the forked flash from heaven; it strikes somewhere.— C.H. Spurgeon

 

Election

Many a young man thought that he had chosen the young lady who became his wife—only to find out after the wedding that she had first chosen him. ── Michael P. GreenIllustrations for Biblical Preaching

 

Election

It is a good thing that God chose me before I was born, because he surely would not have afterwards!— C.H. Spurgeon

 

Identity of Election

When C.H. Spurgeon preached on “election” somebody said to him, “Why don’t you just preach to the called, to the elect?” He replied, “Well, if you’ll run around and pull up everybody’s shirttails so I can see if they have an ‘E’ stamped on their back, I will.”

            Only God knows who is elect and who is not. ── Michael P. GreenIllustrations for Biblical Preaching

 

Definition of Election

C.H. Spurgeon told of a time when he was preaching to a group of Methodist brethren. In his own words he gave us an account of what transpired:

            “Preaching a few months ago in the midst of a large congregation of Methodists, the brethren were all alive, giving all kinds of answers to my sermon, nodding their heads and crying, ‘Amen! Hallelujah! Glory be to God!’ At last a part of text led me to what is styled high doctrine. So I said, this brings me to the doctrine of Election. There was a deep drawing of breath. Now, my friends, you believe it. They seemed to say, ‘No, we don’t’ But you do, and I will make you sing ‘Hallelujah’ over it. I will so preach it to you that you will acknowledge it and believe it. So I put it thus: Is there no difference between you and other men? ‘Yes, yes, glory be to God!’ There is a difference between what you were and what you are now? ‘Oh, yes, yes!’ There is sitting by your side a man who has been to the same chapel as you have, heard the same gospel; he is unconverted, and you are converted. Who has made the difference, yourself or God? ‘The Lord!’ said they. ‘The Lord! Glory! Hallelujah!’ Yes, cried I, and that is the doctrine of Election; that is all I contend for, that if there be a difference, the Lord made the difference.” ── Michael P. GreenIllustrations for Biblical Preaching

 

Predestination and Election

            Election is God’s deciding who gets on the plane bound for heaven.

            Predestination is his charting the route the plane will take, the schedule, the accommodations both during and after the flight, and each passenger’s safety. With God as the pilot of the plane and the plane itself, all who board the plane make it to heaven. Predestination means God himself makes sure the elect actually board the plane. Their response of faith in Christ is like checking in at the gate with a boarding pass.

            The gospel call, in contrast, is like advertising for the trip. The church is commissioned to get the word to the whole world. Unfortunately most people treat God’s free offer as “junk mail” and throw it in the trash. However, those whom God has elected to salvation he also moves to accept his free offer. Many are called, but few are chosen. Yet all who are chosen are predestined to end up in heaven. ── Michael P. GreenIllustrations for Biblical Preaching

 

Election of Judas

            A man once asked a theologian, “Why did Jesus choose Judas Iscariot to be his disciple?” The reply was insightful, “I do not know, but I have an even harder question: Why did Jesus choose me? ── Michael P. GreenIllustrations for Biblical Preaching

 

ELECTION
(see also PREDESTINATION)

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Statistics and Stuff

The elect are the whosoever wills, the non-elect are the whosoever won'ts. 

D.L. Moody.


"Elect" is always used of those who have already become believers, never of those who have not yet received the call. 

J. Huther, Ed., Critical and Exegetical Handbook to the Epistles of St. Paul to Timothy and Titus, Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the N.T.


Paul begins here to extend as it were his hand to restrain the audacity of humans, in case they should clamor against God's judgments. We cannot by our own faculties examine the secrets of God, but we are admitted into a certain and clear knowledge of them by the grace of the Holy Spirit. And just as we ought to follow the guidance of the Spirit, so where He leaves us, we ought to stop there and fix our standing. "If anyone will seek to know more than what God has revealed, he shall be overwhelmed with the immeasurable brightness of inaccessible light. But we must bear in mind the distinction between the secret counsel of God and His will made known in Scripture. For though the whole doctrine of Scripture surpasses in its height the mind of man, yet an access to it is not closed against the faithful, who reverently follow the Spirit; but with regard to God's hidden counsel, the depth and height of it cannot be reached.  

John Calvin.

 

Predestination and Election

            Election is God’s deciding who gets on the plane bound for heaven.

            Predestination is his charting the route the plane will take, the schedule, the accommodations both during and after the flight, and each passenger’s safety. With God as the pilot of the plane and the plane itself, all who board the plane make it to heaven. Predestination means God himself makes sure the elect actually board the plane. Their response of faith in Christ is like checking in at the gate with a boarding pass.

            The gospel call, in contrast, is like advertising for the trip. The church is commissioned to get the word to the whole world. Unfortunately most people treat God’s free offer as “junk mail” and throw it in the trash. However, those whom God has elected to salvation he also moves to accept his free offer. Many are called, but few are chosen. Yet all who are chosen are predestined to end up in heaven.

 

Predestination

        Dr. Harry Ironside told of a man who gave his testimony, telling how God had sought him and found him. How God had loved him, called him, saved him, delivered him, cleansed him, and healed him. It was a tremendous testimony to the glory of God.

        After the meeting, one rather legalistic brother took him aside and said, “You know, I appreciate all that you said about what God did for you, but you didn’t mention anything about your part in it. Salvation is really part us and part god, and you should have mentioned something about your part.”

        “Oh,” the man said, “I apologize. I’m sorry. I really should have mentioned that. My part was running away, and God’s part was running after me until he found me.”