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Will

 

INTENTIONS

         You can't build a reputation on what you are going to do. ── Henry Ford.


         It's always easy the night before to get up early the next morning.── Source Unknown.


         On June 13, 1889, the Spokane newspaper printed an editorial pleading for the establishment of a fire department. Seattle had recently been ravaged by fire, and the paper desired to prevent the same calamity from happening in Spokane. Nothing, however, was done. Two months later Spokane burned to the ground. ── Source Unknown.


         At their school carnival, our kids won four free goldfish (lucky us!), so out I went Saturday morning to find an aquarium. The first few I priced ranged from $40 to $70. Then I spotted it--right in the aisle: a discarded 10-gallon display tank, complete with gravel and filter--for a mere five bucks. Sold! Of course, it was nasty dirty, but the savings made the two hours of clean-up a breeze.

         Those four new fish looked great in their new home, at least for the first day. But by Sunday one had died. Too bad, but three remained. Monday morning revealed a second casualty, and by Monday night a third goldfish had gone belly up.

         We called in an expert, a member of our church who has a 30-gallon tank. It didn't take him long to discover the problem: I had washed the tank with soap, an absolute no-no. My uninformed efforts had destroyed the very lives I was trying to protect. Sometimes in our zeal to clean up our own lives or the lives of others, we unfortunately use "killer soaps"--condemnation, criticism, nagging, fits of temper. We think we're doing right, but our harsh, self-righteous treatment is more than they can bear.── Richard L. Dunagin.


         During the Civil War, Abraham Lincoln said that he could get any number of men who were "willing to shed their last drop of blood." The problem, said Lincoln, was that he found it difficult to get anyone willing to shed that first drop!  ── Today In The Word, November, 1989, p.9.


         The child who is eager to help around the house is usually too young to do it.── Source Unknown.

 

INTENTIONS, good

         Alexander de Seversky, U.S. aviator and engineer, was once visiting a fellow flyer in the hospital. The young man had just lost his leg; de Seversky, who had had an artificial leg for some time, tried to cheer him up. "The loss of a leg is not so great a calamity," he said. "If you get hit on a wooden leg, it doesn't hurt a bit! Try it!" The patient raised his walking stick and brought it down hard on de Seversky's leg. "You see," he said cheerfully. "If you hit an ordinary man like that, he'd be in bed for five days!" With that he left his friend and limped into the corridor, where he collapsed in excruciating pain. It seems the young man had struck de Seversky on his good leg! ── Today in the Word, October 29, 1992.

 

WILL

         Will is the whole man active. I cannot give up my will; I must exercise it. I must will to obey. When God gives a command or a vision of truth, it is never a question of what He will do, but what we will do. To be successful in God's work is to fall in line with His will and to do it His way. All that is pleasing to Him is a success

── enrietta Mears, Dream Big: The Henrietta Mears Story, quoted in Christianity Today, June 21, 1993, Page 41.

 

WILLFULNESS

         An old sailor repeatedly got lost at sea, so his friends gave him a compass and urged him to use it. The next time he went out in his boat, he followed their advice and took the compass with him. But as usual he became hopelessly confused and was unable to find land. 

         Finally he was rescued by his friends.  Disgusted and impatient with him, they asked, "Why didn't you use that compass we gave you? You could have saved us a lot of trouble!" The sailor responded, "I didn't dare to! I wanted to go north, but as hard as I tried to make the needle aim in that direction, it just kept on pointing southeast."  The old sailor was so certain he knew which was was north that he stubbornly tired to force his own personal persuasion on his compass. Unable to do so, he tossed it aside as worthless and failed to benefit from the guidance it offered. ── Source Unknown.

 

WILL, freedom of

         We accompanied our son and his fianc?when they met with her priest to sign some pre-wedding ceremony papers. While filling out the form, our son read aloud a few questions. When he got to the last one, which read: "Are you entering this marriage at your own will?" he looked over at his fianc? "Put down 'Yes,'" she said. ──  Lilyan van Almelo, Reader's Digest, May 1993, p. 138.


         Einstein gave grudging acceptance to "the necessity for a beginning" and eventually, to "the presence of a superior reasoning power," but never did he accept the doctrine of a personal God.  Two specific obstacles blocked his way.  According to his journal writings, Einstein wrestled with a deeply felt bitterness toward the clergy, toward priests in particular, and with his inability to resolve the paradox of God's omnipotence and man's responsibility for his choices.  "If this being is omnipotent, then every occurrence, including every human action, every human thought, and every human feeling and aspiration is also His work; how is it possible to think of holding men responsible for their deeds and thoughts before such an almighty being?  In giving out punishment and rewards He would to a certain extent be passing judgment on Himself.  How can this be combined with the goodness and righteousness ascribed to Him?"  Seeing no solution to this paradox, Einstein, like many other powerful intellects through the centuries, ruled out the existence of a personal God. ── Hugh Ross, The Finger of God, Promise Pub., 1991, p. 59.


         During his days as guest lecturer at Calvin Seminary, R.B. Kuiper once used the following illustration of God's sovereignty and human responsibility.

         "I liken them to two ropes going through two holes in the ceiling and over a pulley above. If I wish to support myself by them, I must cling to them both. If I cling only to one and not the other, I go down."── R.B. Kuiper.


         "I read the many teachings of the Bible regarding God's election, predestination, his chosen, and so on.  I read also the many teachings regarding 'whosoever will may come' and urging people to exercise their responsibility as human beings.  These seeming contradictions cannot be reconciled by the puny human mind.  With childlike faith, I cling to both ropes, fully confident that in eternity I will see that both strands of truth are, after all, of one piece." ── John Morren, Decision Making and the Will of God, p. 205.

 

WILL, bondage of

         Toad baked some cookies. "These cookies smell very good," said Toad. He ate one. "And they taste even better," he said.  Toad ran to Frog's house. "Frog, Frog," cried Toad, "taste these cookies that I have made."

         Frog ate one of the cookies, "These are the best cookies I have ever eaten!" said Frog.

         Frog and Toad ate many cookies, one after another. "You know, Toad," said Frog, with his mouth full, "I think we should stop eating. We will soon be sick."

         "You are right," said Toad. "Let us eat one last cookie, and then we will stop." Frog and Toad ate one last cookie.  There were many cookies left in the bowl.

         "Frog," said Toad, "let us eat one very last cookie, and then we will stop." Frog and Toad ate one very last cookie.

         "We must stop eating!" cried Toad as he ate another.

         "Yes," said Frog, reaching for a cookie, "we need willpower."

         "What is willpower?" asked Toad.

         "Willpower is trying hard not to do something you really want to do," said Frog.

         "You mean like trying hard not to eat all these cookies?" asked Toad.

         "Right," said Frog.  Then Frog put the cookies in a box. "There," he said. "Now we will not eat any more cookies."

         "But we can open the box," said Toad.

         "That is true," said Grog.

         Frog tied some string around the box. "There," he said. "Now we will not eat any more cookies."

         "But we can cut the string and open the box." said Toad.

         "That is true," said Frog. Frog got a ladder. He put the box up on a high shelf. "There," said Frog. "Now we will not eat any more cookies."

         "But we can climb the ladder and take the box down from the shelf and cut the string and open the box," said Toad.

         "That is true," said Frog. He climbed the ladder and took the box down from the  shelf. He cut the string and opened the box. Frog took the box outside. He shouted in a loud voice.  "Hey, birds, here are cookies!" Birds came from everywhere.  They picked up all the cookies in their beaks and flew away.

         "Now we have no more cookies to eat," said Toad sadly. "Not even one."

         "Yes," said Frog, "but we have lots and lots of willpower."

         "You may keep it all, Frog," said Toad. "I am going home now to bake a cake." ── Ray and Anne Ortlund, Renewal, 1989, Navpress, Page 73-74.