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Patience

 

Patience

Patience is letting your motor idle when you feel like stripping the gears. ── Michael P. GreenIllustrations for Biblical Preaching

 

Patience

Patience on the part of young Clyde Tombaugh is what led him finally to discover the planet Pluto. Astronomers had already calculated a probable orbit for this “suspected” heavenly body, which they had never seen. Tombaugh took up the search in March 1929. He examined scores of telescopic photographs, each showing tens of thousands of star images in pairs under the blink comparator, or dual microscope. It often took three days to scan a single pair of photographs. It was exhausting, eye-cracking work, in Tombaugh’s own words, “brutal, tediousness.”The search went on for months. Star by star, Tombaugh examined twenty million images. Finally, on February 18, 1930, as he was blinking a pair of photographs in the constellation Gemini, “I suddenly came upon the image of Pluto!” It was the most dramatic astronomic discovery in nearly one hundred years and it was made possible by patience. ── Michael P. GreenIllustrations for Biblical Preaching

 

Patience

No one treated Lincoln with more contempt than did Edwin Stanton, who denounced Lincoln’s policies and called him a “low cunning clown.” Stanton had nicknamed him “the original gorilla” and said that explorer Paul Du Chaillu was a fool to wander about in Africa trying to capture a gorilla, when he could have found one so easily in Springfield, Illinois. Lincoln said nothing in reply. In fact, he made Stanton his war minister because Stanton was the best man for the job. He treated him with every courtesy. The years wore on.

The night came when an assassin’s bullet struck down Lincoln in a theatre. In a room off to the side where Lincoln’ body was taken, stood Stanton that night. As he looked down on the silent, rugged face of the President, Stanton said through his tears, “There lies the greatest ruler of men the world has ever seen.” The patience of love had conquered in the end. ── Michael P. GreenIllustrations for Biblical Preaching

 

Patience

Hudson Taylor would tell those who wanted to be missionaries to China that there were three indispensable requirements for a missionary:

        1.Patience.

        2.Patience.

        3.Patience.

── Michael P. GreenIllustrations for Biblical Preaching

 

Patience

A teacher had just finished putting the last pair of galoshes on her first-graders-thirty-two pairs in all. The last little girl said, “You know what, teacher? These aren’t my galoshes.”

The teacher removed them from the girl’s feet. Then the little girl continued, “They are my sister’s, and she let me wear them.” The teacher quietly put them back on her pupil.

Now that’s patience! ── Michael P. GreenIllustrations for Biblical Preaching

 

Patience

Chrysostom said that a patient man is one who, having the resources and opportunity to avenge himself, chooses to refrain from the exercise of these. ── Michael P. GreenIllustrations for Biblical Preaching

 

Patience

        Patience is letting your motor idle when you feel like stripping the gears.

 

Patience

        Patience on the part of young Clyde Tombaugh is what led him finally to discover the planet Pluto. Astronomers had already calculated a probable orbit for this “suspected” heavenly body, which they had never seen. Tombaugh took up the search in March 1929. He examined scores of telescopic photographs, each showing tens of thousands of star images in pairs under the blink comparator, or dual microscope. It often took three days to scan a single pair of photographs. It was exhausting, eye-cracking work, in Tombaugh’s own words, “brutal, tediousness.” The search went on for months. Star by star, Tombaugh examined twenty million images. Finally, on February 18, 1930, as he was blinking a pair of photographs in the constellation Gemini, “I suddenly came upon the image of Pluto!” It was the most dramatic astronomic discovery in nearly one hundred years and it was made possible by patience.

 

Patience

        No one treated Lincoln with more contempt than did Edwin Stanton, who denounced Lincoln’s policies and called him a “low cunning clown.” Stanton had nicknamed him “the original gorilla” and said that explorer Paul Du Chaillu was a fool to wander about in Africa trying to capture a gorilla, when he could have found one so easily in Springfield, Illinois. Lincoln said nothing in reply. In fact, he made Stanton his war minister because Stanton was the best man for the job. He treated him with every courtesy. The years wore on.

        The night came when an assassin’s bullet struck down Lincoln in a theatre. In a room off to the side where Lincoln’ body was taken, stood Stanton that night. As he looked down on the silent, rugged face of the President, Stanton said through his tears, “There lies the greatest ruler of men the world has ever seen.” The patience of love had conquered in the end.

 

Patience

        Hudson Taylor would tell those who wanted to be missionaries to China that there were three indispensable requirements for a missionary:

        1.Patience.

        2.Patience.

        3.Patience.

 

Patience

        A teacher had just finished putting the last pair of galoshes on her first-graders-thirty-two pairs in all. The last little girl said, “You know what, teacher? These aren’t my galoshes.”

        The teacher removed them from the girl’s feet. Then the little girl continued, “They are my sister’s, and she let me wear them.” The teacher quietly put them back on her pupil.

        Now that’s patience!

 

Patience

        Chrysostom said that a patient man is one who, having the resources and opportunity to avenge himself, chooses to refrain from the exercise of these.

 

Anger

       A boy once asked, “Dad, how do wars begin?”

       “Well, take the First World War,” said his father. “That got started when Germany invaded Belgium.”

       Immediately his wife interrupted him: “Tell the boy the truth. It began because somebody was murdered.” The husband drew himself up with an air of superiority and snapped back, “Are you answering the question, or am I?” Turning her back upon him in huff, the wife walked out of the room and slammed the door as hard as she could.

       When the dishes stopped rattling in the cupboard, and uneasy silence followed, broken at length by the son when he said, “Daddy, you don’t have to tell me any more; I know now!”

 

Anger, Effect of“When I repress my emotions, my stomach keeps score.” ―― John Powell

 

PATIENCE

The purposes of God often develop slowly because His grand designs are never hurried. The great New England preacher Phillips Brooks was noted for his poise and quiet manner. At times, however, even he suffered moments of frustration and irritability. One day a friend saw him feverishly pacing the floor like a caged lion. "What's the trouble, Mr. brooks?" he asked. 

"The trouble is that I'm in a hurry, but God isn't!" Haven't we felt the same way many times?

Some of the greatest missionaries of history devotedly spread the seed of God's Word and yet had to wait long periods before seeing the fruit of their efforts. William Carey, for example, labored 7 years before the first Hindu convert was brought to Christ in Burma, and Adoniram Judson toiled 7 years before his faithful preaching was rewarded. In western Africa, it was 14 years before one convert was received into the Christian church. In New Zealand, it took 9 years; and in Tahiti, it was 16 years before the first harvest of souls began.

Thomas a Kempis described that kind of patience in these words: "He deserves not the name of patient who is only willing to suffer as much as he thinks proper, and for whom he pleases. The truly patient man asks (nothing) from whom he suffers, (whether) his superior, his equal, or his inferior...But from whomever, or how much, or how often wrong is done to him, he accepts it all as from the hand of God, and counts it gain!" 

Our Daily Bread.


True patience is waiting without worrying.

C. Swindoll, Growing Strong, p. 124.


"Patience serves as a protection against wrongs as clothes do against cold. For if you put on more clothes as the cold increases it will have no power to hurt you. So in like manner you must grow in patience when you meet with great wrongs, and they will then be powerless to vex your mind." 

Leonardo da Vinci.


Patience is a virtue,

Possess it if you can.

Found seldom in a woman,

Never in a man.

 

Source Unknown.

 


To those Christians who are always in a hurry, here's some good advice from the 19th-century preacher A.B. Simpson:

"Beloved, have you ever thought that someday you will not have anything to try you, or anyone to vex you again? There will be no opportunity in heaven to learn or to show the spirit of patience, forbearance, and longsuffering. If you are to practice these things, it must be now." Yes, each day affords countless opportunities to learn patience. Let's not waste them.

Commenting on our need for this virtue, M.H. Lount has said, "God's best gifts come slowly. We could not use them if they did not. Many a man, called of God to...a work in which he is pouring out his life, is convinced that the Lord means to bring his efforts to a successful conclusion. Nevertheless, even such a confident worker grows discouraged at times and worries because results do not come as rapidly as he would desire. But growth and strength in waiting are results often greater than the end so impatiently longed for. Paul had time to realize this as he lay in prison. Moses must have asked, 'Why?' many times during the delays in Midian and in the wilderness. Jesus Himself experienced the discipline of delay in His silent years before His great public ministry began."

God wants us to see results as we work for Him, but His first concern is our growth. That's why He often withholds success until we have learned patience. The Lord teaches us this needed lesson through the blessed discipline of delay. 

Our Daily Bread.


Hebrews 12:1 tells us to "run with endurance" the race set before us. George Matheson wrote, "We commonly associate patience with lying down. We think of it as the angel that guards the couch of the invalid. Yet there is a patience that I believe to be harder -- the patience that can run. To lie down in the time of grief, to be quiet under the stroke of adverse fortune, implies a great strength; but I know of something that implies a strength greater still: it is the power to work under stress; to have a great weight at your heart and still run; to have a deep anguish in your spirit and still perform the daily tasks. It is a Christ-like thing! The hardest thing is that most of us are called to exercise our patience, not in the sickbed but in the street." To wait is hard, to do it with "good courage" is harder! 

Our Daily Bread, April 8.


According to a traditional Hebrew story, Abraham was sitting outside his tent one evening when he saw an old man, weary from age and journey, coming toward him. Abraham rushed out, greeted him, and then invited him into his tent. There he washed the old man's feet and gave him food and drink.

The old man immediately began eating without saying any prayer or blessing. So Abraham asked him, "Don't you worship God?"

The old traveler replied, "I worship fire only and reverence no other god."

When he heard this, Abraham became incensed, grabbed the old man by the shoulders, and threw him out his his tent into the cold night air.

When the old man had departed, God called to his friend Abraham and asked where the stranger was. Abraham replied, "I forced him out because he did not worship you."

God answered, "I have suffered him these eighty years although he dishonors me. Could you not endure him one night?"

Thomas Lindberg.

 
The Fruit Of The Spirit - Longsuffering
 
INTRODUCTION
 
1. In discussing "the fruit of the Spirit", the nine graces listed in 
   Ga 5:22-23 are often divided into three groups:
   a. The first group contains those graces which turns one's thought
      toward God...
      1) Love (for love is of God)
      2) Joy (for we rejoice in the Lord)
      3) Peace (for from God comes the peace that surpasses
         understanding)
   b. The second group contains those graces that directs our attention
      to our fellow man...
      4) Longsuffering
      5) Kindness
      6) Goodness
   c. The third group of graces refer more directly to oneself...
      7) Faithfulness
      8) Gentleness (meekness)
      9) Self-control
 
2. Having examined those graces in the first group (love, joy, peace),
   we now come to the first one in the second group...
   a. The grace is "longsuffering" ("patience" in the NASV)
   b. The Greek word is makrothumia
      1) Literally, it means being "long-tempered" (the opposite of
         short-tempered)
      2) It is defined as "patience, forbearance, longsuffering,
         slowness in avenging wrongs" (THAYER)
      3) "Longsuffering is that quality of self-restraint in the face
         of provocation which does not hastily retaliate or promptly
         punish.  It is the opposite of anger and is associated with
         mercy, and is used of God." (VINE)
   c. If God is longsuffering, we should not be surprised that those
      who "walk in the Spirit" are also longsuffering!
 
[As we seek to work in conjunction with the Spirit of God to develop
His fruit in our lives, it might be helpful to nurture longsuffering by
recalling some...]
 
I. EXAMPLES OF LONGSUFFERING
 
   A. THE LONGSUFFERING OF GOD...
      1. God has been longsuffering toward man
         a. He was in the days of Noah - 1 Pe 3:20
         b. He was in His dealings with the nation of Israel - Neh 9:
            16-21
         c. And He is longsuffering today as well - 2 Pe 3:7-9; e.g.,
            1 Ti 1:15-16
      2. The purpose of His longsuffering:
         a. That we might have salvation! - 2 Pe 3:15
         b. That we might be led to repentance! - Ro 2:4
         c. That those who fear Him and keep His commandments might
            delight in His lovingkindness, even though they have sinned
            - cf. Ps 103:8-18
 
   B. THE LONGSUFFERING OF DAVID...
      1. Is best seen in his dealings with King Saul
         a. Saul had made several attempts to kill David
         b. David had several opportunities to kill Saul
            1) In the cave - 1 Sam 24:1-22
            2) In the camp - 1 Sam 26:1-25
      2. Out of respect for the Lord's anointed king (Saul), David
         demonstrated the true meaning of longsuffering:  "slowness
         in avenging wrongs"
 
[So from both God Himself, and one who was "a man after God's own 
heart" (1 Sam 13:14), we learn what the quality of longsuffering 
involves.  Now let's consider its necessity in the life of the 
Christian...]
 
II. THE NECESSITY OF LONGSUFFERING
 
   A. NECESSARY IF WE WISH GOD TO BE LONGSUFFERING TO US...
      1. As Jesus illustrated in "The Parable Of The Unmerciful 
         Servant" (note particularly Mt 18:32-35)
      2. Compare also the following verses:  Co 3:12-13
         a. Christ has forgiven us
         b. Therefore we must be longsuffering and willing to forgive
            one another!
 
   B. NECESSARY TO MAINTAINING THE UNITY OF THE SPIRIT...
      1. A task we face, in keeping with a walk that is worthy of our
         calling - Ep 4:1-3
      2. Without longsuffering, the sins we commit against one another
         will quickly destroy the unity for which Christ died!
 
   C. NECESSARY FOR PREACHERS AND TEACHERS OF THE GOSPEL...
      1. As Paul charged Timothy - 2 Ti 4:2
      2. As Paul had demonstrated by example - 2 Ti 3:10
      3. No servant of the Lord can faithfully correct those in 
         opposition, without the quality of longsuffering (patience in
         the NKJV) - 2 Ti 2:24-26
 
[So to be "useful for the Master, prepared for every good work" (cf. 
2 Ti 2:21), and even to ensure God's longsuffering toward us (cf. Mt 
18:35), we need to develop the virtue of longsuffering.  Here are a
couple of thoughts on how...]
 
III. DEVELOPING LONGSUFFERING
 
   A. THROUGH LOVE...
      1. It is love that "suffers long" - cf. 1 Co 13:4-8a
         a. Unless we love those who have wronged us, there will not be
            sufficient motivation to bear with them
         b. Therefore love (active good will) is fundamental to being
            slow to avenge wrong
      2. By growing in love (to remember how, cf. 1 Th 4:9; 1 Jn 3:16),
         we will grow in patience!
 
   B. THROUGH PRAYER...
      1. Paul evidently believed prayer would help the Colossians to
         have "all patience and longsuffering with joy" - Co 1:9-11
      2. Certainly the God who is longsuffering (cf. Ps 145:8) will
         strengthen those who desire to be like Him!
 
CONCLUSION
 
1. God has certainly revealed Himself to be longsuffering, as David
   wrote in his psalm:
 
   "But You, O Lord, are a God full of compassion, and gracious,
      Longsuffering and abundant in mercy and truth." - Ps 86:15
 
2. For those who desire to be truly His children, and led by His
   Spirit, they will want to become like Him, as David wrote just a few
   verses before:
 
   "Teach me Your way, O Lord;
      I will walk in Your truth;" - Ps 86:11a
 
3. The way of the Lord is truly one involving longsuffering, and it 
   will be a quality evident in the lives of those who bear the fruit
   of the Spirit!
 
May the Lord help us to be longsuffering with those around us!  May we
also be careful to respond to the Lord's longsuffering toward us in the
proper way... - cf. Ro 2:4-6

 

--《Executable Outlines