| Back to Home Page | Back to Book Index |

 

Diligence

 

Laziness

A farmer was sitting on the porch of his house when a stranger came by and asked, ‘How’s things?”

“Tolerable,” came the reply. He continued, “Two weeks ago a tornado came along and knocked down all the trees I would have had to chop down for this winter’s firewood. Then last week lightning struck the brush I had planned to burn to clear the fields for planting.”

The stranger responded, “That’s remarkable, what are you doing now?”

The farmer answered, “Waiting for an earthquake to come along and shake the taters out of the ground.” ── Michael P. GreenIllustrations for Biblical Preaching

 

Laziness

According to John Silling, a Purdue University entomologist, the ant is an exemplary worker. “Basically the ant’s entire life, which can range up to seven years, is spent working,” says Silling. “They gather food, bring it back to the nest, and use it for day-to-day meals as well as to store for the winter.”

In addition, the amazing insects can be adept horticulturalists, states the professor. Some species “gather bits of grass or leaves and take them back to their nest. On this organic matter, which is used much like fertilizer, they place tiny mushroom spores and grow them for food.” But ants as dairy-keepers? That’s right. “Some ants get the majority of their food by ‘milking’ aphids or plant lice which are often known as ‘ant cows,’ says the scientist. “The ants sometimes herd the aphids down into the ant nests at night or when it starts to get cool, then when it gets warm again, they herd them back up to the plants.” ── Michael P. GreenIllustrations for Biblical Preaching

 

Laziness

Humorist Ogden Nash captured the bitter truth about laziness:

        If you don’t want to work

        You have to work

        To earn enough money

        So that you won’t have to work.

── Michael P. GreenIllustrations for Biblical Preaching

 

Laziness

F.O. Walsh gave this basis for laziness:

        While other men paint,

        Or water or weed,

        I’m curled up in a chair,

        With a good book to read.

        While other men shop,

        Or shovel, or mow,

        I’m having a drink

        While watching some show.

        I offer to help,

        But my wife says, “Forget it,

        If you lend a hand,

        I know I’ll regret it.”

        And therein’s my secret,

        I’m very adept

        At only one thing,

        And that’s being inept.

── Michael P. GreenIllustrations for Biblical Preaching

 

IDLENESS

Unamuno, the Spanish philosopher, tells about the Roman aqueduct at Segovia, in his native Spain. It was built in 109 A.D. For eighteen hundred years, it carried cool water from the mountains to the hot and thirsty city. Nearly sixty generations of men drank from its flow.

Then came another generation, a recent one, who said, "This aqueduct is so great a marvel that it ought to be preserved for our children, as a museum piece. We shall relieve it of its centuries-long labor." They did; they laid modern iron pipes. They gave the ancient bricks and mortar a reverent rest. And the aqueduct began to fall apart. The sun beating on the dry mortar caused it to crumble. The bricks and stone sagged and threatened to fall. What ages of service could not destroy idleness  disintegrated.

Resource, Sept./ Oct., 1992, p. 4.

 

LAZINESS

Sheer laziness has probably been responsible for more shortcuts, not to mention valuable inventions, than we are ready to admit. Most of us are continually on the lookout, at least subconsciously, for easier ways to perform onerous or routine tasks.

An example of imagination spurred on by outright lethargy is contained in the story of an old mountaineer and his wife who were sitting in front of the fireplace one evening just whiling away the time.

After a long silence, the wife said: "Jed, I think it's raining. Get up and to outside and see."

The old mountaineer continued to gaze into the fire for a second, sighed, then said, "Aw, Ma, why don't we just call in the dog and see if he's wet." 

Bits & Pieces, April 29, 1993, p. 3.


Some people would do anything to be able to do nothing. 

Frank Tyger.


A personnel manager rejected a job applicant because the firm was overstaffed. But the would-be employee persisted, "The little bit of work I'd do won't even be noticed!"

Source Unknown.

 

Laziness

        Humorist Ogden Nash captured the bitter truth about laziness:

        If you don’t want to work

        You have to work

        To earn enough money

        So that you won’t have to work.

 

Laziness

        F.O. Walsh gave this basis for laziness:

        While other men paint,

        Or water or weed,

        I’m curled up in a chair,

        With a good book to read.

        While other men shop,

        Or shovel, or mow,

        I’m having a drink

        While watching some show.

        I offer to help,

        But my wife says, “Forget it,

        If you lend a hand,

        I know I’ll regret it.”

        And therein’s my secret,

        I’m very adept

        At only one thing,

        And that’s being inept.

 

DILIGENCE.

Each of the evangelists bears testimony to the diligence of the women in coming early to the sepulcher. Matthew says, “ They came, at the end of the Sabbath, as it began to dawn toward the first day of the week.” Luke, “ They prepared their spices, and rested on the Sabbath, and came early the next day.” John, “ They came the first day of the week when it was yet dark” (Matt.28:1; Luke 24:1; John 20:1). It is only those who do things diligently and promptly that do things well.

See what the Lord says the Christian is to do diligently.

. Unity. “ Endeavouring to keep” (Eph.4:3).

. Study. “ Study to shew thyself,” c.(11. Tim.2:15).

. Rest. “ Let us labour to enter” (Heb.4:11)

. Calling. “ Give diligence to make,” c.(11.Peter 1:10).

. Watchfulness. “ Be diligent that ye may be found,” c.(11. Peter 3:14).

. Business. “ Not slothful in business” (Rom.7:11).

. Consecration. “ Giving all diligence” (11.Peter 1:5).

The italicized words denote that they are one and the same in the Greek.

── F.E. MarshFive Hundred Bible Readings