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Life

 

Brief Life

Average life spans are shorter than most of us realize.  Unlike the great redwood trees that can last for a thousand or more years, most other things come and go quicker than we would imagine.  After a little digging, I found several examples that illustrate how temporary things really are:

   Copper Plumbing   20-25 years

   Cat               15 years

   Face-Lift         6-10 years

   Vitamin           3 years

   Dollar Bill       18 months

   Painted line

      on the road    3-4 months

   Pro-basketball

      player's shoes 2 weeks

   Tornado           10 minutes

I purposely omitted human beings.  There are differences of opinion, but most would agree it's somewhere between 75 and 80 years.  That may sound encouraging to the young and pretty disturbing to those in their eighties.  The simple fact is, nobody knows for sure how long he or she may live.  When we read and believe the warnings in Scripture, there is little doubt that life is short.  James pulls no punches when he writes, "You are just a vapor that appears for a little while and then vanishes away" (4:14).  Life?  A puff of smoke...a cloud of dust... -- Charles Swindoll

 

Happiness in Life

Charlie Brown, pondering his plight in life, thought, “Yesterday, for one brief moment I was happy. But just when I thought I was sinning in the game of life, there was a flag thrown on the play and life dealt me a blow. ── Michael P. GreenIllustrations for Biblical Preaching

 

Perspective of Life

In a “Peanuts” comic strip, there was a conversation between Lucy and Charlie Brown. Lucy said that life is like a deck chair. Some place it so they can see where they are going; some place it so they can see where they have been; and some place it so they can see where they are at present. Charlie Brown’s reply: “I can’t even get mine unfolded.” ── Michael P. GreenIllustrations for Biblical Preaching

 

Life’s Purpose

Someone has aptly said, “Living without God’s plan for our life is like sewing with a needle without thread, or writing one’s biography with a pen empty of ink.” ── Michael P. GreenIllustrations for Biblical Preaching

 

Life’s Purpose

Some tine ago, psychologist William Moulton Marston asked three thousand persons, “What have you to live for?”

He was shocked to find that 94 percent were simply enduring the present while waiting for the future. They would describe this as waiting for “something” to happen-waiting for children to grow up and leave home, waiting for next year, waiting for another time to take a long-dreamed-about trip, waiting for tomorrow. They were all waiting without realizing that all anyone ever has is today because yesterday is gone and tomorrow never comes. ── Michael P. GreenIllustrations for Biblical Preaching

 

Life’s Uncertainty

A young couple desiring to go into missionary work had invited a missionary couple to their home. The host couple kept mentioning that life was so “uncertain” for them because the husband had multiple sclerosis. He could either be eventually immobilized in a hospital bed, or live normally until death, or die unexpectedly.

After hearing the term uncertain so many times, the missionary turned to the couple and said, “All of our lives are uncertain. You just happen to know it, and most of us don’t.” ── Michael P. GreenIllustrations for Biblical Preaching

 

Living in Past

Our past, mistakes as well as worthwhile accomplishments, is like a car’s rear-view mirror. While driving, we use the broad view through the windshield as we move ahead, but we also use the mirror for reference, making quick, periodic glances into it for information to aid in making driving decisions. Although we cannot effectively or safely move ahead by staring only into the mirror and ignoring the view from the windshield, “proper” use of the mirror does ensure a safer, smoother trip to our destination.

In the same way, we are not to dwell in our past, but live by using the lessons of the past as a reference to aid our journey into the future. ── Michael P. GreenIllustrations for Biblical Preaching

 

Suicide

Some time ago an article in the paper recorded two deaths. A middle-aged couple died in each other’s arms-the result of a suicidal overdose of drugs-because they couldn’t face separation by death.

A psychiatry professor at a large university and his wife left a suicide note explaining that the wife was suffering from emphysema and kidney, liver, and heart ailments. Doctors had told her she might live up to five years or die at any time. Their oldest son said, “My father and mother were very much in love with each other. We wondered what my father would do if anything ever happened to Mom.” Lewis said his parents often discussed suicide. “This solution was not a bad one,” he added.

This couple could not face reality, because they had no hope beyond the present. ── Michael P. GreenIllustrations for Biblical Preaching

 

Age

Esteem age and you will always have life to look forward to. Esteem youth and you proclaim your own obsolescence. ── Michael P. GreenIllustrations for Biblical Preaching

 

Day-to-Day Life

Yard by yard, life is hard.

        Inch by inch, it’s a cinch.

── Michael P. GreenIllustrations for Biblical Preaching

 

Life’s Purpose

All have been given a bag of tools,

        A formless rock and a book of rules.

        And each must make ere life has flown,

        A stumbling block or a stepping stone.

── Michael P. GreenIllustrations for Biblical Preaching

 

Life’s Purpose

He who has a “why” to live for can bear with almost any “how”.— Friedrich Nietzsche, a German nihilist

 

Life’s Purpose

Lord, make me an instrument of Thy peace;

        Where there is hatred, let me sow love;

        Where there is doubt, faith;

        Where there is despair, hope;

        Where there is darkness, light; and

        Where there is sadness, joy.

        O Divine Master, grant that I may not so much

        Seek to be consoled, as to console;

        To be understood as to understand;

        To be loved, as to love;

        For it is in giving that we receive;

        It is in pardoning that we are pardoned; and

        It is in dying that we are born to eternal life.— Francis of Assisi

 

HUMAN LIFE

Someone has calculated how a typical lifespan of 70 years is spent. Here is the estimate:

Sleep................23 years...........32.9%

Work.................16 years...........22.8%

TV....................8 years...........11.4%

Eating................6 years............8.6%

Travel................6 years............8.6%

Leisure.............4.5 years............6.5%

Illness...............4 years............5.7%

Dressing..............2 years............2.8%

Religion............0.5 years............0.7%

Total................70 years............100%

 

Our Daily Bread, November 25, 1992.

 

LIFE

The tragedy of life is not that it ends so soon, but that we wait so long to begin it.

Richard L. Evans, Bits & Pieces, March 4, 1993, p. 2.


Someone has calculated how a typical lifespan of 70 years is spent. Here is the estimate:

Sleep................23 years...........32.9%
Work.................16 years...........22.8%
TV....................8 years...........11.4%
Eating................6 years............8.6%
Travel................6 years............8.6%
Leisure.............4.5 years............6.5%
Illness...............4 years............5.7%
Dressing..............2 years............2.8%
Religion............0.5 years............0.7%

Total................70 years............100%

Our Daily Bread, November 25, 1992.


In an average lifetime, the average American spends 3 years in business meetings, 13 years watching TV, Spends $89,281 on food, consumes 109,354 pounds of food, Makes 1811 trips to McDonalds, Spends $6881 in vending machines, Eats 35,138 cookies and 1483 pounds of candy, Catches 304 colds, Is involved in 6 motor vehicle accidents, is hospitalized 8 times (men) or 12 times (women), Spends 24 years sleeping. 

Tom Heymann, In an Average Lifetime.


The seven ages of man: spills, drills, thrills, bills, ills, pills, wills. 

Richard J. Needham, The Wit and Wisdom of Richard Needham.


A story making the rounds concerns a Biology I examination in which the students were asked: "Suppose you could take to Mars any of the laboratory equipment used in this course. How would you determine if there was life on Mars?" One student responded: "Ask the inhabitants. Even a negative answer would be significant." The student got an A. 

Carl Sagan, Other Worlds.


If I had my whole life to live over again, I don't think I'd have the strength. 

Flip Wilson.


Seize the moment. Remember all those women on the Titanic who waved off the dessert cart. 

Erma Bombeck.