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Service Related

 

Joy in Service

Dr. William Ott and his wife spent their 1986 vacation ministering in the Philippines.  Working hard in a politically unstable area and spending several thousand dollars of their own money, they upgraded the training and equipment of a mission-sponsored dental clinic.  All they got on the human level was the heartfelt thanks of the clinic's dentist.  But that was enough!

After returning home, Dr. Ott told Dr. Maurice Irvine, a colleague, about his summer.  Commenting on this conversation, Dr. Irvine said he detected in Dr. Ott a deep, inner sense of satisfaction, something he could not possibly have found in a whole summer vacationing and having fun.  He had experienced the supreme

joy that comes from unselfish service. ── Michael P. GreenIllustrations for Biblical Preaching

 

Objectives

In Alive in Wonderland, at one point Alice says to the Cheshire Cat, “Would you tell me, please, which way I ought to go from here?”

“That’s depends a good deal on where you want to get to,” said the Cat.

“I don’t much care where,” said Alice.

“Then it doesn’t matter which way you go,” said the Cat.

As with Alice, so with us and the church. Without objectives, we will have nowhere to go, and we’ll just keep wandering aimlessly. ── Michael P. GreenIllustrations for Biblical Preaching

 

Opposition

The way is which we need to stand in the face of opposition is aptly described by a word the British use: “steady.” To illustrate this word’s meaning, picture a British commander in the nineteenth century as he and his regiment are being approached by a horde of Bedouins brandishing swords. As he awaits the battle, he reviews his past experiences in battle and his regiment’s capabilities and-being confident of victory-also considers the future sense of accomplishment this experience will give him. And so he remains “steady.”

As believers, we should learn to rely on the testimony of God’s past accomplishments, his present work in our lives, and his promise of ultimate victory, and thus remain “steady” in the face of opposition. ── Michael P. GreenIllustrations for Biblical Preaching

 

Responsibility

When a flock of crows invades a field of corn, the birds customarily station two sentries in a nearby tree to keep watch and warn the rest of any danger. In Character Sketches, Bill Gothard relates the story of two people who succeeded in sneaking up on the flock and scaring them before the sentries had given warning. The birds burst into flight, immediately attacked and killed the two sentries, and only then flew off. ── Michael P. GreenIllustrations for Biblical Preaching

 

Servanthood

D.L. Moody once said, “The measure of a man is not how many servants he has, but how many men he serves.” ── Michael P. GreenIllustrations for Biblical Preaching

 

Servanthood

The Navigators are will known for their emphasis on having an attitude of servanthood. A businessman once asked Lome Sanny, then president of the Navigators, how he could know when he had a servantlike attitude. The answer was, “By how you act when you are treated like one.” ── Michael P. GreenIllustrations for Biblical Preaching

 

Servanthood

A sign read, “There is no limit to the good that a man can do, if he doesn’t care who gets the credit.”

If you really don’t care who gets the credit, then you can just enjoy yourself and do all kinds of good deeds for others. Just be glad that it is done, and don’t worry about who gets the credit on earth, because you heavenly Father knows. ── Michael P. GreenIllustrations for Biblical Preaching

 

Servanthood

A student at a Bible school in the Philippines became disturbed over the condition of the men’s rest rooms, since they always seemed to be neglected in the cleaning routine. When nothing was done to eliminate the filth, he took matters into his own hands and complained to the principal of the school. A little while later, the student noticed that the problem was being corrected, but he saw with amazement that the man with the mop and pail in hand was the principal himself!

Later the student commented, “I thought that he would call a janitor, but he cleaned the toilets himself. It was a major lesson to me on being a servant and, of course, it raised a question in my own mind is why I hadn’t taken care of the problem!” ── Michael P. GreenIllustrations for Biblical Preaching

 

Servanthood

A.E. Whitham has an imaginary preacher give the following report of a visit to the New Jerusalem:

“In my wandering, I came upon the museum in the city of our dreams, I went in, and an attendant conducted me round. There was some old armor there, much bruised with battle. Many things were conspicuous by their absence. I saw nothing of Alexander’s or napoleon’s. There was no pope’s ring, nor even the ink bottle that Luther is said to have thrown at the devil. I saw a widow’s mite and the feather of a little bird. I saw some swaddling clothes, a hammer and three nails and a few thorns. I saw a sponge that had once been dipped in vinegar and a small piece of silver. Whilst I was turning over a simple drinking cup which had a very honorable place, I whispered to the attendant: ‘Have you got a towel and basin among your collection?’ ‘No,’ he said, ‘not here. You see, they are in constant use.’” ── Michael P. GreenIllustrations for Biblical Preaching

 

Qualifications for Service

D.L. Moody aptly observed, “We may easily be too big for God to use, but never too small.” ── Michael P. GreenIllustrations for Biblical Preaching

 

Rewards of Service

Many years ago a humble pastor served a church in a little country town. His ministry was quiet, and few souls were brought to Christ there. Year in and year out, the work became more and more discouraging. It was only years later that the faithful minister found great joy in the knowledge that one of those he had won to Christ was Charles Haddon Spurgeon, a man who was later used by God to bring multitudes to his Son. Humble service is rewarded now and certainly will be rewarded even more when Christ comes. ── Michael P. GreenIllustrations for Biblical Preaching

 

Stewardship

First Corinthians 4:1 tells us to be “stewards of the mysteries of God” (RSV). If you have ever been on a ship, you know what a ship’s steward is. Or is you have ever been on an airplane, you know what a steward or a stewardess is. That person does not own the airplane or anything on the plane. The company owns everything, but he or she is entrusted with its care. That steward has been given the responsibility of taking the goods that belong to a higher authority and dispensing it to the people for their benefit. That is a steward-on an airplane or ship-and in the spiritual realm as well. ── Michael P. GreenIllustrations for Biblical Preaching

 

Stewardship

Epictetus, a Stoic Philosopher, is recorded as having said the following:

“Never say about anything, ‘I have lost it,’ but only ‘I have given it back.’ Is your child dead? It has been given back. Is your wife dead? She has been given back. ‘I have had my farm taken away.’ Very well, this too has been given back. Yet it was a rascal who took it away. But what concern is it of yours by whose instrumentality the Giver called what concern is it of yours by whose instrumentality the Giver called for its return? So long as He gives it to you, take care of it as of a thing that is not your own, as travelers treat their inn.”

If this non-Christian could see all of life as a stewardship, how much more should we believers? ── Michael P. GreenIllustrations for Biblical Preaching

 

Stewardship

In the movie Papillon, the main character was a criminal who was imprisoned for life for crimes against the French state. The movie portrayed the dreams he had while in prison. In on dream, he stood before a tribunal for a crime. He pleaded with the judge that he was not guilty of the crime for which he was being tried. The judge replied that he was not being tried for that crime, but for a crime that is the most heinous crime of the human race. Papillon asked what crime it was. He replied, “The crime of a wasted life.” Papillon wept, “Guilty, guilty.” The judge pronounced the sentence of death. ── Michael P. GreenIllustrations for Biblical Preaching

 

Commitment

A certain dog had always boasted of his ability as a runner. Then one day a rabbit that he was chasing got away. This brought a lot of ridicule from the other dogs because of his previous boasting. His explanation: “You must remember that the rabbit was running for his life, while I was only running for my dinner.”

 

Commitment

On August 11, 1978, Double Eagle II, a large helium balloon, and her crew of three eased into an almost windless sky above the potato fields of Maine. Their destination was Paris, France. The aerodynamics of ballooning are somewhat complex, but one thing is certain. In order for the balloon to stay aloft as the journey progressed, ballast (that which is used to add weight)had to be expelled. As they approached continental Europe six days later, one of the crew wrote, “We have been expending ballast wisely, but as we neared land, not cheaply…over went such gear as tape recorders, radios, film magazines, sleeping bag, lawn chairs, most of our water, food, and the cooler it was in.”

        Following Christ is the wisest choice a man can make, but it does not come cheap. Just as for these balloonists many important things had to be abandoned because they weighed them down, so for the believer.

        P.S. The balloonists’ mission was accomplished.

 

Commitment

For many days an old farmer had been plowing with an ox and a mule together and working them pretty hard. The ox said to the mule, “Let’s play sick today and rest a little while.” But the old mule said, “No, we need to get the work done, for the season is short.”

        But the ox played sick, and the farmer brought him fresh hay and corn and made him comfortable. When the mule came in from plowing, the ox asked how he made out. “We didn’t get as much done, but we made it all right,” answered the mule. Then the ox asked, “What did the old man say about me?” “Nothing,” said the mule.

        The next day the ox, thinking he had a good thing going, played sick again. When the mule came in again very tired, the ox asked, “How did it go?” The mule said, “All right, I guess, but we didn’t get much done.” Then the ox also asked, “What did the old man say about me?” “Nothing to me,” was the reply, “but he did stop and have a long talk with the butcher.”

 

Commitment

John Audubon, the well-known naturalist and artist, practiced great self-mastery in order to learn more about birds. Counting his physical comforts as nothing, he would rise at midnight night after night and go into the swamps to study certain nighthawks. He would crouch motionless in the dark and fog, hoping to discover just one more additional fact about a single species.

        During one summer, Audubon repeatedly visited the bayous near New Orleans to observe a shy water bird. He would stand almost to his neck in the stagnant waters, scarcely breathing, while poisonous water-moccasin snakes swam past his face. It was not comfortable or pleasant, but he beamed with enthusiasm and is reported to have said, “But what of that? I have the picture of the birds.” He endured all these things just for a picture of a bird!

        If a man could be so disciplined for a temporal and physical reward, how much more committed should the child of God be for the imperishable prize before him?

 

Commitment

Many men of the world have understood the necessity for commitment if they are to accomplish great things. For example, when Spanish explorer Cortez landed at Vera Cruz in 1519 to begin his conquest of Mexico with a small force of seven hundred men, legend has it that he purposely set fire to his fleet of eleven ships. Presumably, his men on the shore watched their only means of retreat sink to the bottom of the Gulf of Mexico. There was now only one direct to move—forward into the Mexican interior to meet whatever might come their way.

        As part of our commitment as Christ’s disciples, we must purposefully destroy all avenues of retreat. We must resolve that whatever price is required for being his follower, we will pay it.

 

Commitment

In the 1976 Summer Olympics, Shun Fujimoto competed in the team gymnastics competition for Japan. In a quest for the gold medal, Fujimoto suffered a broken right knee in the floor exercise. But his injury did not stop him, for during the next week he competed in his strongest event, the rings. His routine was excellent, but he astounded everyone by squarely dismounting with a triple somersault twist on a broken right kneel. When asked concerning his feat, he said, “Yes, the pain shot through me like a knife. It brought tears to my eyes. But now I have a gold medal and the pain is gone.”

 

Commitment

Henry Thoreau, that rugged New England individualist of the nineteenth century, once went to jail rather than pay his poll tax to a state that supported slavery. Thoreau’s good friend Ralph Waldo Emerson hurred to visit him in jail and, peering through the bars, exclaimed: “Why, Henry, what are you doing in there?”

        The uncowed Thoreau replied, “Nay, Ralph, the question is, what are you doing out there?”

 

Commitment

The story is told that when James Calvert went out as a missionary to the cannibals of the Fiji Islands, the Captain of the ship that had carried him there sought to turn him back by saying, “You will lose your life and the lives of those with you if you go among such savages.” Calvert’s reply well demonstrates the cost of commitment: “We died before we came here.”

 

Commitment

A mission society is reported to have written to David Livingstone: “Have you found a good road to where you are? If so, we want to send other men to join you.” Livingstone replied: “If you have men who will come only if they know there is a good road, I don’t want them. I want men who will come if there is no road at all.”

 

Commitment

Robert Chapman of Barnstaple, a great friend of the late George Muller of Bristol, was once asked, “Would you not advise young Christians to do something for the Lord?” “No,” was the reply, “I should advise them to do everything for the Lord.”

 

Communist Commitment

”If you ask me what is the distinguishing mark of the Communist, what is it that Communists most outstandingly have in common, I would not say, as some might expect, their ability to hate…, I would say beyond any shadow of doubt it is their idealism, their zeal, dedication, devotion to their cause and willingness to sacrifice.”—Douglas Hyde, former head of the Communist Party of Great Britain, before his conversion to Catholicism.

 

Cost of Commitment

A hen and a pig approached a church and read the advertised sermon topic: “What can we do to help the poor?” Immediately the hen suggested they feed them bacon and eggs. The pig thought for a moment and said, “There is only one thing wrong with feeding bacon and eggs to the poor. For you it requires only a contribution, but for me it requires total commitment!”

 

Cost of Commitment

And elderly Christian man in Communist-controlled Budapest remarked when asked about the effects of persecution and discrimination on the lives of Christians: “it is like the deep, fast-flowing Danube River. The banks of the river were artificially narrowed throughout the city of Budapest. As a result the river’s fast waters dug deeper and deeper into the river bottom.”

        Believers under restrictions and persecution have limited freedom and few political options, but their narrowed lives have found great depth by going deeper in Christ.

 

Experience

            It has been said that there is not a man or woman alive who could not retire comfortably in their old age if they could sell their experience for what it cost them.

 

Experience

            Experience is a wonderful thing. It enables you to recognize a mistake when you make it again.

 

Experience

            A useful axe must be sharp, but to have a sharp axe you must be willing to allow it to suffer loss on the grindstone. In a similar way, if you want to live a life that is useful in service to God, you must be willing to allow him to put you on the grindstone of trials and testings so that you may be made sharp through loss.

 

Priority of Service

        When Dr. W.A. Criswell, pastor of the largest Southern Baptist church in the world, was preaching in the North Shore Baptist Church in Chicago, he was entertained at the home of deacon James L. Kraft, who was superintendent of the Sunday school and founder of Kraft Foods. Kraft said that as a young man he had a desire to be the most famous manufacturer and salesman of cheese in the world. He planned on becoming rich and famous by making and selling cheese and began as a young fellow with a little buggy pulled by a pony named Paddy. After making his cheese, the youth he would load his wagon and he and Paddy would drive down the streets of Chicago to sell the cheese. As the months passed, the young Kraft began to despair because he was not making any money, in spite of his long hours and hard work.

        One day he pulled his pony to a stop and began to talk to him. He said, “Paddy, there is something wrong. We are not doing it right. I am afraid we have things turned around an dour priorities are not where they ought to be. Maybe we ought to serve God and place him first in our lives.” Kraft then drove home and made a covenant that for the rest of his life he would first serve God and then would work as God directed.

        Many years after this, Dr. Criswell heard James Kraft say, “I would rather be a layman in the North Shore Baptist Church than to head the greatest corporation in America. My first job is serving Jesus.”—Adapted from W.A. Criswell, Acts

 

Qualifications for Service

        D.L. Moody aptly observed, “We may easily be too big for God to use, but never too small.”

 

Rewards of Service

        Many years ago a humble pastor served a church in a little country town. His ministry was quiet, and few souls were brought to Christ there. Year in and year out, the work became more and more discouraging. It was only years later that the faithful minister found great joy in the knowledge that one of those he had won to Christ was Charles Haddon Spurgeon, a man who was later used by God to bring multitudes to his Son. Humble service is rewarded now and certainly will be rewarded even more when Christ comes.

 

Stewardship

        First Corinthians 4:1 tells us to be “stewards of the mysteries of God” (RSV). If you have ever been on a ship, you know what a ship’s steward is. Or is you have ever been on an airplane, you know what a steward or a stewardess is. That person does not own the airplane or anything on the plane. The company owns everything, but he or she is entrusted with its care. That steward has been given the responsibility of taking the goods that belong to a higher authority and dispensing it to the people for their benefit. That is a steward-on an airplane or ship-and in the spiritual realm as well.

 

Stewardship

        Epictetus, a Stoic Philosopher, is recorded as having said the following:

        “Never say about anything, ‘I have lost it,’ but only ‘I have given it back.’ Is your child dead? It has been given back. Is your wife dead? She has been given back. ‘I have had my farm taken away.’ Very well, this too has been given back. Yet it was a rascal who took it away. But what concern is it of yours by whose instrumentality the Giver called what concern is it of yours by whose instrumentality the Giver called for its return? So long as He gives it to you, take care of it as of a thing that is not your own, as travelers treat their inn.”

        If this non-Christian could see all of life as a stewardship, how much more should we believers?

 

Stewardship

        In the movie Papillon, the main character was a criminal who was imprisoned for life for crimes against the French state. The movie portrayed the dreams he had while in prison. In on dream, he stood before a tribunal for a crime. He pleaded with the judge that he was not guilty of the crime for which he was being tried. The judge replied that he was not being tried for that crime, but for a crime that is the most heinous crime of the human race. Papillon asked what crime it was. He replied, “The crime of a wasted life.” Papillon wept, “Guilty, guilty.” The judge pronounced the sentence of death.

 

Tact

        The new minister’s family was presented with a pie baked by a congregational member who was a rather poor cook. The pie was inedible, so the minister’s wife reluctantly threw it into the garbage. The preacher was faced with the problem of thanking the baker and at the same time being truthful. After much thought, he sent the following note: “Thank you for being so kind and thoughtful. I can assure you that a pie like yours never lasts long at our house.”

 

Tact

        An English Puritan, Quire Bruen, was at a dinner given by the sheriff, and a toast to the prince was proposed. As the cup of wine was passed along the line, they looked to see what the Puritan would do. He said, “You may drink to his health, and I will pray for his health,” and so passed the cup.

 

Zeal

            Before the opening day of pheasant season, two city-dwellers who aspired to be hunters bought a bird dog, having heard that such a dog would make for much more enjoyable and profitable hunting. When the big day came, they were up bright and early. They hunted all day, but as dusk began to overtake them, they hadn’t fired a single shot. The hunters were exhausted and frustrated over the poor performance of their bird dog. Finally one said, “Okay, Joe, throw him up once more and if he don’t fly this time, I’m gonna shoot him!”

 

Servanthood

        You know Lord how I serve You,

              with great emotional fervor,

              in the limelight.

        You know how eagerly I speak for You,

              At a women’ club.

        You know how I effervesce when I promote

              Fellowship group.

        You know my genuine enthusiasm

              At a Bible study.

        But how would I react, I wonder,

              If You pointed to a basin of water,

              And asked me to wash the calloused feet

              Of a bent and wrinkled old woman,

              Day after day,

              Month after month,

              In a room where nobody saw,

              And nobody knew?— Ruth Harms Calkin

 

Service

        There’s a clever young guy named Somebody Else,

        There’s nothing this guy can’t do.

        He is busy from morning till way late at night,

        Just substituting for you.

        You’re asked to do this or you’re asked to do that

        And what is your ready reply?

        Get somebody Else to do that job,

        He’ll do it much better than I.

        So much to do in this weary old world-

        So much and worker so few,

        And Somebody Else, all weary and worn,

        Is still substituting for you.

        The next time you’re asked to do something worthwhile,

        Just give this ready reply:

        If Somebody Else can give time and support,

        My goodness, so can I!

── Michael P. GreenIllustrations for Biblical Preaching

 

SERVICE

Most people wish to serve God -- but in an advisory capacity only.

Quoted in Sunday Express, London.


Self-righteous service comes through human effort. True service comes from a relationship with the divine Other deep inside.
Self-righteous service is impressed with the "big deal." True service finds it almost impossible to distinguish the small from the large service.
Self-righteous service requires external rewards. True service rests contented in hiddenness.
Self-righteous service is highly concerned about results. True service is free of the need to calculate results.
Self-righteous service picks and chooses whom to serve. True service is indiscriminate in its ministry.
Self-righteous service is affected by moods and whims. True service ministers simply and faithfully because there is a need.
Self-righteous service is temporary. True service is a life-style.
Self-righteous service is without sensitivity. It insists on meeting the need even when to do so would be destructive. True service can withhold the service as freely as perform it.
Self-righteous service fractures community. True service, on the other hand, builds community.

Richard Foster, Celebration of Discipline, "The Discipline of Service."


During World War II, England needed to increase its production of coal. Winston Churchill called together labor leaders to enlist their support. At the end of his presentation he asked them to picture in their minds a parade which he knew would be held in Picadilly Circus after the war.

First, he said, would come the sailors who had kept the vital sea lanes open. Then would come the soldiers who had come home from Dunkirk and then gone on to defeat Rommel in Africa. Then would come the pilots who had driven the Luftwaffe from the sky.

Last of all, he said, would come a long line of sweat-stained, soot-streaked men in miner's caps. Someone would cry from the crowd, 'And where were you during the critical days of our struggle?' And from ten thousand throats would come the answer, 'We were deep in the earth with our faces to the coal.'"

Not all the jobs in a church are prominent and glamorous. But it is often the people with their "facs to the coal" who help the church accomplish its mission.

Don McCullough, Waking from the American Dream.


Unamuno, the Spanish philosopher, tells about the Roman aqueduct at Segovia, in his native Spain. It was built in 109 A.D. For eighteen hundred years, it carried cool water from the mountains to the hot and thirsty city. Nearly sixty generations of men drank from its flow. Then came another generation, a recent one, who said, "This aqueduct is so great a marvel that it ought to be preserved for our children, as a museum piece. We shall relieve it of its centuries-long labor."

They did; they laid modern iron pipes. They gave the ancient bricks and mortar a reverent rest. And the aqueduct began to fall apart. The sun beating on the dry mortar caused it to crumble. The bricks and stone sagged and threatened to fall. What ages of service could not destroy idleness disintegrated.

Resource, Sept./ Oct., 1992, p. 4.


In his book 70 X 7, The Freedom of Forgiveness, David Ugsberger tells of General William Booth, the founder of the salvation Army, who had lost his eyesight. His son Bramwell was given the difficult task of telling his father there would be no recovery. "Do you mean that I am blind?" the General asked. "I hear we must contemplate that," his son replied. The father continued,"I shall never see your face again?" "No, probably not in this world." "Bramwell," said General Booth, "I have done what I could for God and for His people with my eyes. Now I shall do what I can for God without my eyes."

David Ugsberger, 70 X 7, The Freedom of Forgiveness.


The great violinist, Nicolo Paganini, willed his marvelous violin to Genoa -- the city of his birth -- but only on condition that the instrument never be played upon. It was an unfortunate condition, for it is a peculiarity of wood that as long as it is used and handled, it shows little wear. As soon as it is discarded, it begins to decay. The exquisite, mellow-toned violin has become worm-eaten in its beautiful case, valueless except as a relic. The moldering instrument is a reminder that a life withdrawn from all service to others loses its meaning.

Bits & Pieces, June 25, 1992.


During the American Revolution a man in civilian clothes rode past a group of soldiers repariing a small defensive barrier. their leader was shouting instructions, but making no attempt to help them. Asked why by the rider, he retorted with great dignity, "Sir, I am a corporal!" The stranger apologized, dismounted, and proceeded to help the exhausted soldiers. The job done, he turned to the corporal and said, "Mr. Corporal, next time you have a job like this and not enough men to do it, go to your commander-in-chief, and I will come and help you again." It was none other than George Washington.

Today in the Word, March 6, 1991.


Franklin Roosevelt's closest adviser during much of his presidency was a man named Harry Hopkins. During World War II, when his influence with Roosevelt was at its peak, Hopkins held no official Cabinet position. Moreover, Hopkins's closeness to Roosevelt caused many to regard him as a shadowy, sinister figure. As a result he was a major political liability to the President. A political foe once asked Roosevelt, "Why do you keep Hopkins so close to you? You surely realize that people distrust him and resent his influence." Roosevelt replied, "Someday you may well be sitting here where I am now as President of the United States. And when you are, you'll be looking at that door over there and knowing that practically everybody who walks through it wants something out of you. You'll learn what a lonely job this is, and you'll discover the need for somebody like Harry Hopkins, who asks for nothing except to serve you." Winston Churchill rated Hopkins as one of the half-dozen most powerful men in the world in the early 1940s. And the sole source of Hopkins's power was his willingness to serve.

Discipleship Journal, Issue 39 (1987), p. 5.


In 1878, when William Booth's Salvation Army was beginning to make its mark, men and women from all over the world began to enlist. One man, who had once dreamed of becoming a bishop, crossed the Atlantic from America to England to enlist. Samuel Brengle left a fine pastorate to join Booth's Army. But at first General Booth accepted his services reluctantly and grudgingly. Booth said to Brengle, "You've been your own boss too long." And in order to instill humility in Brengle, he set him to work cleaning the boots of other trainees. Discouraged, Brengle said to himself, "Have I followed my own fancy across the Atlantic in order to black boots?" And then, as in a vision, he saw Jesus bending over the feet of rough, unlettered fishermen. "Lord," he whispered, "you washed their feet; I will black their shoes."

K Hughes, Liberating Ministry From The Success Syndrome, Tyndale, 1988, p. 45.


In the spring of 1883 two young men graduated from medical school. The two differed from one another in both appearance and ambition. Ben was short and stocky. Will was tall and thin. Ben dreamed of practicing medicine on the East Coast. will wanted to work in a rural community. Ben begged his friend to go to New York where they could both make a fortune. Will refused. His friend called him foolish for wanting to practice medicine in the Midwest. "But," will said, "I want first of all to be a great surgeon...the very best, if I have the ability." Years later the wealthy and powerful came from around the world to be treated by Will at his clinic...the Mayo Clinic.

Today in the Word, July, 1990, p. 17.


It had been a long day on Capitol Hill for Senator John Stennis. He was looking forward to a bit of relaxion when he got home. After parking the car, he began to walk toward his front door. Then it happened. Two people came out of the darkness, robbed him, and shot him twice. News of the shooting of Senator Stennis, the chairman of the powerful Armed Forces Committee, shocked Washington and the nation. For nearly seven hours, Senator Stennis was on the operating table at Walter Reed Hospital. Less than two hours later, another politician was driving home when he heard about the shooting. He turned his car around and drove directly to the hospital. In the hospital, he noticed that the staff was swamped and could not keep up with the incoming calls about the Senator's condition. He spotted an unattended switchboard, sat down, and voluntarily went to work. He continued taking calls until daylight. Sometime during that next day, he stood up, stretched, put on his overcoat, and just before leaving, he introduced himself quietly to the other operator, "I'm Mark Hatfield. Happy to help out." Then Senator Mark Hatfield unobtrusively walked out. The press could hardly handle that story. There seemed to be no way for a conservative Republican to give a liberal Democrat a tip of the hat, let alone spend hours doing a menial task and be "happy to help out."

Knofel Stanton, Heaven Bound Living, Standard, 1989, p. 35.


Years ago, the Salvation Army was holding an international convention and their founder, Gen. William Booth, could not attend because of physical weakness. He cabled his convention message to them. It was one word: "OTHERS."

Unknown.


Whatever is done for God, without respect of its comparative character as related to other acts, is service, and only that is service. Service is, comprehensively speaking, doing the will of God. He is the object. All is for Him, for His sake, as unto the Lord, not as unto man. Hence, even the humblest act of humblest disciple acquires a certain divine quality by its being done with reference to Him.

The supreme test of service is this: 'For whom am I doing this?' Much that we call service to Christ is not such at all....If we are doing this for Christ, we shall not care for human reward or even recognition. Our work must again be tested by three propositions: Is it work from God, as given us to do from Him; for God, as finding in Him its secret of power; and with God, as only a part of His work in which we engage as co-workers with Him."

A.T. Pierson wrote, The Truth.